In one way or another, we know the world through our bodies. They are complex machines–contained chaos, if you will–and infinitely fascinating. It is no surprise to me that artists, philosophers and sociologists (among many) return to the body as a site of investigation and exploration. The artists below offer an especially intriguing framework for considering the human body–they offer up adornment that fragments it and turns it into an object to be worn. A represented body could refer to someone specific or no one in particular–either way, when it is turned into jewelry and worn by someone it becomes a part of that body, the wearer’s body, and a cycle of meaning is created that consistently refers one to the other.



Jessica Calderwood, Blink (enamel, copper and sterling silver)


chrysanthemum_red  chrysanthemums

Heather White, Chrysanthemums (brooches, 2004, sterling silver and cast resin teeth)



Julia Harrison, A Dozen Rose Buds (brooches of wood, lacquer, gouache, epoxy + more)



Margaux Lange, The Kiss (sterling silver, plastic and epoxy resin)



Sarah J.G. Wauzynski, Small Demands (brooch in sterling silver, egg tempera pigment and 18kt gold)



Ineke Heerkens, Ring (leather)



Stacy Rodgers, Breasts



Melanie Bilenker, Feet (2007; brooch of gold, sterling silver, ebony, resin, pigment and hair, 1 x 7/8 x 3/8 in.)







So, when my best friend sees something she really likes–something she desires in a visceral way–she says she wants to put it in her mouth. This could be anything but it is usually something inanimate, something that you would not really eat, but that you want to “devour” in some way. I love that this is her reaction and I know exactly what she means. For me, the qualities of lusciousness also call into question ideas of decadence, the baroque, luxury, consumption, preciousness and many other concepts that seem related but are not necessarily so. The following address these topics in one way or another while creating objects that I would describe as exquisite (and, maybe…, edible).



Lauren Fensterstock, Grey Garden (2003; quilled paper; 20 x 25 in.)



Caroline GoreSugarcoat from the Beauty: Poison series (1 ounce of 24K gold, coated with sugar, arranged in a hanging installation)



Green Planks (2007, cast sugar, polyurethane, 78 x 3/4″ x varying widths)


Rebcecca Holland, Glaze (2003; 800 square feet of poured candy)



Jolynn Krystosek, detail (two above) and Verdure Series, Untitled 7 (2007; wax; 13 x 19 in.)





Roberley Bell, Flower Blob #64. (2005; cast foam with dyed plastic and flocking; 16 1/2 x 18 x 7 in.)


Tara Strickstein (detail of installation)


Shary Boyle Snowball (2006; porcelain and china paint; Collection of the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal)