CURATING IN SPACE


LUSCIOUS

 

So, when my best friend sees something she really likes–something she desires in a visceral way–she says she wants to put it in her mouth. This could be anything but it is usually something inanimate, something that you would not really eat, but that you want to “devour” in some way. I love that this is her reaction and I know exactly what she means. For me, the qualities of lusciousness also call into question ideas of decadence, the baroque, luxury, consumption, preciousness and many other concepts that seem related but are not necessarily so. The following address these topics in one way or another while creating objects that I would describe as exquisite (and, maybe…, edible).

 

 

Lauren Fensterstock, Grey Garden (2003; quilled paper; 20 x 25 in.)

 

 

Caroline GoreSugarcoat from the Beauty: Poison series (1 ounce of 24K gold, coated with sugar, arranged in a hanging installation)

 

 

Green Planks (2007, cast sugar, polyurethane, 78 x 3/4″ x varying widths)

 

Rebcecca Holland, Glaze (2003; 800 square feet of poured candy)

 

 

Jolynn Krystosek, detail (two above) and Verdure Series, Untitled 7 (2007; wax; 13 x 19 in.)

 

 

 

 

Roberley Bell, Flower Blob #64. (2005; cast foam with dyed plastic and flocking; 16 1/2 x 18 x 7 in.)

 

Tara Strickstein (detail of installation)

 

Shary Boyle Snowball (2006; porcelain and china paint; Collection of the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal)

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